DY(S)B: Guest Tutorial- Buckled Waistband

Please welcome Sabra from Sew a Straight Line! I'm so excited to have Sabra here sharing a tutorial. Take some time to check out her fantastic blog! Oh, and go congratulate her on her news!

Dress your school boy header

Hi, I’m Sabra from Sew a Straight LineMay[5]
When Andrea told me about Dress Your (School) Boy, I knew I wanted in.  I love to sew for my boys.  I have three sons, and have never once felt like I had a lack of things to make for them.  They are constantly inspiring me and suggesting new ideas to me.  One thing I love about sewing for boys is the challenge of coming up with details that aren’t frilly, but still add interest and uniqueness to a project.  I think the trick with details and boys’, and men’s clothing is that form has to meet function.  No matter how superfluous the function is, if it can be justified utilitarianly, you can slap it on there.  Just look at cargo pants! My boys are skinny. No, *really* skinny. Like don’t even register on the charts, nurses-checking-to-make-sure-their-scales-still-work skinny. Skinny. Adjustable waistbands aren’t just a convenience, they’re a necessity around here. But plain elastic waistbands are boring, full-on fastening flies are a chore to sew in, and belts are not so easy for busy boys to manipulate. My solution:

Buckled waistband_thumb[4]

I’m going to show you how to take pretty much any basic pattern for simple pants and/or shorts and give them some masculine, functional flair.   You can even retro-fit existing pants with this update. As I said, you can add this to any pants or short pattern you want instead of a drawstring or elastic waistband.  You could even retro-fit a pair, if you unpick the waistband seems first.  So all you need to do the Adjustable Buckled Waistband is – a pair of bottoms with an unfinished waist – one-inch webbing (found in the notions of any fabric store, usually by elastic) – one-inch braided elastic – a center release buckle (found in notions of any fabric store)IMG_6116Begin by finishing the edge of the waistband.  Here I did a serged edge, then a 1/4 inch hem.  If you’re retro-fitting, the edges might already be finished for you.  IMG_6117_thumb[2] 
With the bottoms wrong-side-out, pin the waistband over about 1.5-2 inches all the way around.  IMG_6118_thumb[2] 
Flip the bottoms right-side-out.  Place the buckle in the center front and use as a guide to mark two parallel lines at either end of the buckle.  IMG_6120_thumb[2] Use the webbing to mark the top and bottom of those lines you just made.  IMG_6121_thumb[2] 
So now you have two “I”-like markings at either side of the front center seam.  IMG_6122_thumb[2] Unpin the waistband and pull the front center area out and away.  IMG_6123_thumb[2] 
Using those “I” markings as guides, sew in two buttonholes at either point.  IMG_6124_thumb[2] Fold the waistband back over, repin, and sew all the way around.  IMG_6125_thumb[2] Get your webbing.  Measure the bottom-wearer’s waist all the way around, then add about five to six inches.  Cut the webbing to those measurements.  Then cut that length of webbing in half. IMG_6127_thumb[2]Cut about four to five inches of braided elastic.  IMG_6128_thumb[2]Sew the webbing to the elastic, forming a fun little elastic bridge between the two webbing pieces.  IMG_6129_thumb[2] I like to do a crazy-thick zig-zag stitch at every raw edge. 
; IMG_6130_thumb[2]Thread the one open end of the webbing through the female side of the buckle.  IMG_6131_thumb[2]Fold over, fold raw edge under, and do a sweet little box-stitch design to finish that side.  IMG_6132_thumb[3]Thread the other end of the webbing through one buttonhole…  IMG_6133_thumb[3]And come out the other.  Use a safety pin to aid in drawing through the waistband.  IMG_6134_thumb[3]Now thread that open end of the webbing through the male side of the buckle. IMG_6135_thumb[3]Fold raw edge under twice, to hide, and do another box-stitch design on that side. IMG_6136_thumb[3]Buckle and… IMG_6137_thumb[3]GO! IMG_6141 Thanks to the adjustable webbing, pants stay on (and can fit the next kid down the line, if needed, too!).  The extra bit of elastic helps small hands to take on and off by themselves.  And the exposed buckle adds just a little bit more awesomeness to a basic pair of shorts keeping your kid looking good.IMG_6147Form and function, it’s a beautiful thing. IMG_6150_thumb[9]Adjustable Buckle Waistbands get the thumbs-up from the resident males around here.  IMG_6142 Now you go try them out! Thanks again, Andrea and Train to Crazy fans.  Feel free to stop by Sew a Straight Line for tons of  boy projects and other fun sewing stuff, too!  project boy

Thanks so much Sabra! This is fantastic!

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Comments

  1. says

    I hardly ever comment but I really need to tell you THANK YOU for this tutorial!!! My baby boy is a skinny one as well and pants/shorts his size just fall right off :( But he’s also a good height for his age so any pants/shorts in a smaller size make him look like he’s waiting for a flood or sporting daisy dukes :/
    I will definitely be trying this tutorial! THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!

  2. says

    They are constantly inspiring me and suggesting new ideas to me. One thing I love about sewing for boys is the challenge of coming up with details that aren’t frilly, but still add interest and uniqueness to a project. I think the trick with details and boys’, and men’s clothing is that form has to meet function. No matter how superfluous the function is, if it can be justified utilitarianly, you can slap it on there.

  3. says

    Brilliant!
    1. I am sick of using up so much elastic.
    2. Kids are getting older elastic just doesn’t look as good on a big kid.
    Conclusion: this rocks!
    thanks