25 Days of Giving, a year round effort

Each year that I've done the 25 Days of Giving since I started the tradition, I've found it difficult. Planning and actually carrying out 25 days of giving activities is tough! There are days when we don't accomplish our task. There are days when we just don't feel like doing the project we had planned, or maybe it just makes us plain uncomfortable. There are also days when our planned project just seems like a waste of time.

I don't allow it to become a stress because that is not the point. The point isn't to "do good" or to see how much we can accomplish. The point is to focus on loving and serving others during the season we celebrate the one who came to serve and love {and SAVE} us. (read more about the 25 Days of Giving)

Though maybe you have joined in with our 25 Days of Giving because you just want your kids to stop thinking of the holidays as a time of "give me." Whatever your motive for joining, I'd like to encourage you to keep it up while putting realistic expectations on yourself and your family. This shouldn't just be one more thing on the To Do List. 

December is fast approaching so now is the perfect time to begin thinking about the 25 Days of Giving. I compiled some great lists last year to help get your creative juices flowing. 

Free (or nearly free) giving activities

Not so free giving activities

While you are considering joining the 25 Days of Giving this year, I'd like to encourage you to do some research in your area and see where your family can serve others regularly. Perhaps you'd like to make a monthly meal at your local Ronald MacDonald House for the families staying there while their children are in the hospital? Or maybe you can volunteer weekly to collect food for your local food bank. Perhaps you want to get up on Saturday mornings and make a giant stack of hot pancakes to handout to the homeless? Maybe you can volunteer year round at a local Operation Christmas Child Collection Center. Tempted to help your 6 year old sew or knit something monthly from the Craft Hope book?

There are many organizations that do not want your children "helping". But there are many creative ways you CAN involve them. Let's think outside the box. What are some ways that you get your family involved in regular activities of giving? Anything you've been wanting to do or been tempted to try? Let's share our ideas and I'll compile a list!

Do you know of ongoing charities that accept handmade items? I'd love to hear about those as well!

Comments

  1. clo says

    I like your attitude. After all if we all gave up because we did not do 3 out of the 25 for example then how sad on the 22 days where we would have made a difference.

  2. Maria says

    I’m going to check out your list of suggestions. I think this would be fun to do if they are small enough things that my girls could enjoy.
    We visit the knit and crochet group at a local nursing home weekly (or when we can lately) as a way of giving back. They LOVE to see my girls running and talking and playing. Yearly our family “adopts” a family for Christmas through the Gospel Mission. I try to request a family with children close in age to my own. That way the girls can pick out a toy and be more involved.
    When I was growing up our families tradition was to each choose a stuffed animal and we donated them to Children’s Hospital for the children that didn’t get to be home on Christmas. I think they accept things year round. Project Linus accepts quilts and blankets year round as well to give to foster kids, preemies, and other fragile children.

  3. maryanne says

    I think the easiest way I keep my children involved in giving is to keep a donation box in the garage – and to then encourage them to add things they don’t feel they need to it on a regular basis.